Umbra Sumus – Posters and a Pop Up Gallery

Posted on March 30, 2014

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Re-writing my artists statement for my East End project (Umbra Sumus), has prompted me to think again about how I might present the work. My thoughts to date have centred on high quality gallery prints of the image text panels. However, having re-positioned my work to be an exploration of the ephemeral nature of immigration in the East End, I am wondering if the form of display should match the subject matter, i.e.it should be a more temporary.

I have started to investigate the idea of producing the image/text panels as posters. Interestingly other artist/photographers such as Victor Burgin used this approach. A quick survey has shown that I should be able to get 30×24 inch posters printed for around £10 each. Discounts apply for greater numbers. My idea would be to model my posters on a style of low cost art prints, like the one below, showing a photograph and an anchoring text/caption. Ansel Adams idealised view of the American landscape is very popular!

©Ansel Adams

©Ansel Adams

My poster would look like this:

Pennyfields Limehouse, former Shanghai Chinatown

Pennyfields Limehouse, former Shanghai Chinatown

 

I would hang the posters from plastic hangers (£4.00 each) similar to the ones shown below. The hangers would be suspended from wire running along a wall or if the space were appropriate across a room/space.

Poster hangers

Poster hangers

My thought is that I would invest in a stock of the poster prints and try to find a venue  where I could set up a pop-up-shop style of exhibition, hanging the prints (maybe from washing lines) using the hangers. I would look to sell my stock of posters with the net proceeds going to a local charity – most probably Toynbee Hall.  They would be relatively inexpensive and as such within the financial reach of many more people. This approach, if successful would get my work out to a wider audience and with luck raise a few hundred pounds for an East End charity at the same time…. Early days but food for thought…

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